Greater than Gold (Book review)

Greater than Gold: from Olympic heartbreak to ultimate redemption
David Boudia with Tim Ellsworth
Thomas Nelson, 2016

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I first came across Olympic diver David Boudia when I saw him and his excellently named teammate Steele Johnson talk about having their identity in Christ when interviewed after winning silver at the Rio 2016 (a video which has been watched nearly 5 million times).

This book, written before Rio, recounts Boudia’s life and conversion up to and after he won gold in the 2012 Olympics in London. But this is far more than just a Christian sports autobiography – it’s a portrait of someone trying to apply the gospel to every area of life. For example, Boudia shows very clearly that the gospel isn’t just for the start of the Christian life – he talks about wrong behaviours and attitudes in his life that have emerged when he’s stopped living in light of the gospel. Before he became a Christian, sporting success was where he looked for his identity – and that idol didn’t just disappear once he was born again.

Boudia is insightful on nearly every subject area he touches – marriage, work etc. For example he writes: ‘sometimes we get the idea that we should be passionate about our work all the time [but] our work was never designed to provide us with the joy and satisfaction we can only find in Jesus’. Reading this book is nearly like a reading a Christian counselling book, because he makes it so clear what it looks like to apply the gospel to every area of life.

I’ll close with the reaction of this newly converted Olympic athlete to hearing that he could get to go to church TWICE in one day:

“My heart leaped for joy when [they] said they’d be going back again that night. ‘You’re going back back to church again’, I asked in astonishement. ‘Yeah, I’d love to go with you’.
Church twice in one day? The old me would rather have done anything else. The new me – the one in whose heart God was doing a work of grace and redemption – couldn’t get enough.”

Thanks to Thomas Nelson for a complimentary copy of this book