The Prayers of Jesus

The Prayers of Jesus: listening to and learning from our Saviour
Mark Jones
Crossway, 2019

First up, if you’re expecting a book to help you in your prayer life, this isn’t necessarily it. Of course, studying the prayers of Jesus should help your prayer life, but that’s not the direction in which Jones applies this. It’s more seeing what theology we can learn from Jesus’ prayers. Like Jones’s other books, it’s not exactly lay-person friendly (the chapters are short but dense). He acknowledges himself that the introduction isn’t the most accessible – but actually I think large parts of it would be beyond the average person in the pew.

Even for the more theologically-informed reader, the book is hit and miss – the quality of the chapters varies quite significantly. Jones also spends over half the book (14 chapters) going through Jesus’ prayer in John 17. This is the middle section of the book, and where I feel it loses its way a bit.

There are plenty of gems throughout it. For someone who likes to get the digs in against exclusive psalmody, Jones assumes the psalms are about Christ in a way many exclusive psalmists don’t! As usual he is particularly good on children/parenting: ‘in believing households, children must be taught to pray, by faith, as early as possible’ (you’d think that was obvious but sadly people would argue against it!). There are also some great one-liners: while urging believers to say grace, he reminds us ‘Prayers at restaurants do not need to be re-enactments of Daniel 9’.

Overall, as a fan of the other books by Jones that I’ve read, I was a bit disappointed. It will be a handy resource to have for preaching eg on the sayings on the cross. In short, this book is a great idea, the execution is just a little lacking.

Thanks to Crossway for a complimentary copy of this book through their Beyond the Page review programme.