6 ways the Old Testament speaks today

6 ways the Old Testament speaks today: an interactive guide
Alec Motyer
Crossway, 2018

6 ways the OT speaks today

A new book by Alec Motyer is always an exciting event, especially coming two years after he was promoted to glory. In actual fact, this is the North American title for the second edition of his Scenic Route through the Old Testament.
As the subtitle suggests, this isn’t really a book to be read straight through. It has six chapters, each introducing a different Old Testament genre, and then a week’s worth of Bible readings, with comments (and an additional month of readings and comments in the appendix).
Being Motyer, there are plenty of gems scattered throughout. I particularly liked his comment on p. 42: ‘pagan religions those who penetrated into the innermost sanctuary came face-to-face with some idol, but in the tabernacle they came face-to-face with the moral law’. He also uses the phrase ‘social righteousness’, which seems preferably to ‘social justice’. Nor does he shy away from the less popular parts of the Old Testament, commenting helpfully on the imprecatory psalms. Elsewhere he asks the question ‘Do the Psalms point to the Lord Jesus Christ’, and part of his answer (about how they reflect the hope of a perfect king) is worth quoting in full:

“The Psalms reflect it as they sing of a king who faces world opposition (2:1–3; 110:1–2) but is victorious (45:3–5; 89:22–23). By the Lord’s help (18:46–50; 21:1–13) he establishes world rule (2:8–12; 45:17; 72:8–11; 110:5–6), which is based at Zion (2:6) and marked by righteousness (45:4, 6–7; 72:2–3; 101:1–8). His rule is everlasting (21:4; 45:6; 72:5), peaceful (72:7), prosperous (72:16), and devoted (72:5). The king is preeminent among people (45:2, 7), friend of the poor, and enemy of the oppressor (72:2–4, 12–14). He owns an everlasting name (72:17) and enjoys ever- lasting blessing (45:2). He is heir to David’s covenant (89:28–37; 132:11–12) and to Melchizedek’s priesthood (110:4). He belongs to the Lord (89:18), is his Son (2:7; 89:27), sits at his right hand (110:1), and is himself divine (45:6). It is very likely that these psalms were used as coronation an- thems, sung before the new king as he took his throne, in order to “hold him to the highest.” But the reality was always more than any mere son of David could be. It awaited the unique Son of David who is also the Son of God (Luke 1:32).”

I think that’s a yes.

Thanks to Crossway for a complimentary copy of this book through their Beyond the Page review programme.